Compositae Mix
 

This patient information on Compositae Mix is provided by John L. Meisenheimer, M.D. a board certified Dermatologist and skin care specialist based in Orlando, Florida.  This information is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice or treatment of a dermatologist or other physician.

The results from your patch testing showed a positive reaction (contact allergy) to Compositae mix. Your immune system reacts with its defense mechanisms with each exposure of Compositae mix to your skin. It is unknown why certain individuals develop allergic sensitivities. In some it may take repeat exposures over long periods of time before an allergy develops. Once you have become sensitized (allergic) your immune system always "remembers" and you will be Compositae sensitive. If you currently have eczema this chemical may be the cause but other factors may play a role as well. The information below will help you avoid this allergen.

This chemical mix consists of extracts from five different plants: Chamomile, Tansy, Yarrow, Arnica, and Feverfew. Arnica, Chamomile, and Feverfew are flowers and Yarrow and Tansy are herbs. These extracts are commonly found in cosmetic and skin ointments. Anyone reacting to a number of herbs should consider checking for a salicylate sensitivity as virtually all herbs have a high salicylate content. This chemical may have cross-reactions with other types of plant family called Laurel e.g. Laurus nobilis, family of Lauraceae and members of the family Magnoliaceae.

Where is chemical found?

Conditioners
Cosmetics
Health care products
Lip balms
Medicines
Oils
Shampoos
Skin Cream
Skin lotions

Hints on avoiding chemical:
Choose products listed only your personalized Contact Allergen Database, which has been provided to you. Products listed on you Contact Allergen Resource Database will be free of Compositae Mix and safe to use.
Please be aware that if your spouse or significant other uses topical skin care products that contain this chemical skin-to-skin transfer may occur to you.
It may take 2 to 3 weeks of avoiding exposure before improvement of your eruption begins.
Should avoid touching these plants or going near them due to the risk of airborne contact dermatitis from pollen.

Plants you may be sensitive to and should be avoided:

Chamomile: Common Chamomile, English Chamomile, Chamomilla Recutita, True Chamomile

Tansy:    Scented Fern, Stinking Willie, Tanacetum Vulgare

Yarrow:    Bloodwort, Milfoil, Sanguinary, Stanchgrass, Thousand-leaf

Arnica:    Leopard's-bane, Mountain Tobacco, Arnica Montana

Feverfew:    Bachelor's-button, Featherfew, Featherfoil, Wild Chamomile, Chrysanthemum

Possible occupational exposures:
   
Florists
    Farmers
    Cooks
    Horticulturists

John L. Meisenheimer, M.D.  2004                                   WWW.OrlandoSkinDoc.com