Mercaptobenzothiazole

This patient information on Mercaptobenzothiazole is provided by John L. Meisenheimer, M.D. a board certified Dermatologist and skin care specialist based in Orlando, Florida.  This information is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice or treatment of a dermatologist or other physician.

The results from your patch testing showed a positive reaction (contact allergy) to Mercaptobenzothiazole.  Your immune system reacts with its defense mechanisms with each exposure of Mercaptobenzothiazole to your skin.  It is unknown why certain individuals develop allergic sensitivities.  In some it may take repeat exposures over long periods of time before an allergy develops.  Once you have become sensitized (allergic) your immune system always "remembers" and you will continue to be Mercaptobenzothiazole sensitive.  If you currently have eczema this chemical may be the cause but other factors may play a role as well.  This information below will help you avoid this allergen.

This agent is commonly used in the production of rubber products.  It is the most common cause of shoe contact dermatitis and rubber contact dermatitis.

Where is chemical found?

Accelerator
Adhesive tape and bandages
Anticorrosive agents
Antifreeze
Balloons
Boots
Brassieres
Caulking
Cements
Condoms
Cutting oils
Dental dams
Detergents
Dialysis equipment
Diaphragms
Earphones
Electrodes
Elastic and rubberized clothing
Electrical cords
Erasers
Flea powders
Fungicides
Garden hoses
Girdles
Gloves (medical and household)
Glue for leather and plastics
Medical devices
Photographic film emulsion
Rubber bands
Rubber clothing
Rubber handles on tools
Rubber eyelash curlers
Rubber pillows
Rubber sheets
Rubber shoes (sneakers, tennis shoes, etc.)
Rubber undergarments
Safety goggles
Shoes
Sponge makeup applicators
Stethoscopes
Support stockings
Swimwear and goggles
Tick powder
Tires and tubes
Toys
Veterinary medications

Hints on avoiding chemical:

Try to minimize your exposure to all rubber products.  It may be difficult to determine which rubber products contain MBT.  You may substitute products made of vinyl, plastic, leather, wood and fabric.

Be suspicious of any product containing rubber that seems to cause a rash where it touches your body.

Choose products listed only on your personalized Contact Allergen Database, which has been provided to you.  Products listed on your contact allergen resource database will be free of Mercaptobenzothiazole and safe to use.

It may take 2 to 3 weeks of avoiding exposure before improvement of your eruption begins.

Other names you see Mercaptobenzothiazole listed as:

2-Benzathiazalethiol
2-Mercaptobenzothiazole
Captax
Dermacid
MBT
Mertax
Nocceler M
Rotax
Thiotax

Possible Occupational Exposures*

    Nurses
    Plumbers/pipe fitters
    Machine operators

*Other occupational exposures to mercaptobenzothiazole can occur.

If you have a shoe contact dermatitis:

Wear solid leather shoes like moccasins or wood clogs (no inner or outer rubber soles).  Try insoles free of MBT to see if this makes dress shoes wearable for you.

Socks and stockings worn with shoes containing MBT can be contaminated and may not wash out easily and should be discarded.

Leather shoes can have mercaptobenzothiazole in soles, lining and adhesives.

Ask your shoe store for rubber free shoes.

John L. Meisenheimer, M.D.  2004                                   WWW.OrlandoSkinDoc.com