POTASSIUM DICHROMATE

 

This patient information on Potassium Dichromate is provided by John L. Meisenheimer, M.D. a board certified Dermatologist and skin care specialist based in Orlando, Florida.  This information is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice or treatment of a dermatologist or other physician.

The results from your patch testing showed a positive reaction (contact allergy) to Potassium Dichromate. Your immune system reacts with its defense mechanisms with each exposure of Potassium Dichromate to your skin. It is unknown why certain individuals develop allergic sensitivities. In some it may take repeat exposures over long periods of time before an allergy develops. Once you have become sensitized (allergic) your immune system always "remembers" and you will be Potassium Dichromate sensitive. If you currently have eczema this chemical may be the cause but other factors may play a role as well. The information below will help you avoid this allergen.

Chrome is a metal used in the manufacturing of chrome steel and stainless steel. Other frequent sources of skin contact are concrete cement and leather products.

Where is chemical found?

Alloys of metallurgy
Adhesives
Anticorrosive in antifreeze, oils and paints.
Automobile
Bleach
Blue prints
Bricks
Catgut sutures
Cement
Ceramics
Chrome plating
Chrome steel
Chromium picolinate
Copy paper
Dental implants
Detergents
Drywall
Electroplating
Electric batteries
Engraving and lithography
Eye shadow
Fireworks
Floor wax
Foundries (added to sand for bricks)
Glue
Green dyes
Ink
Mascara
Matches
Metalurgy (alloys)
Milk testing
Mortar
Orthopedic
Pacemaker wires
Paint (esp. green, orange, yellow)
Photography (color developing)
Pigments
Plaster
Pool table felt
Safety matches
Shoe polish
Stainless steel
Tanning of leather
Tattoos (Green)
Textile dyes (military green)
TV manufacturing
Vitamin supplements
Welding
Wood preservative

Hints on avoiding chemical:
Always Check product labels and use only ingredient labeled products that do not list this chemical or its synonyms.
Avoid leather products such as shoes belts, gloves and etc… Vegetables tanned leather is okay.
Choose products listed only on your personalized contact allergen database, which has been provided to you. Products listed on your contact allergen resource database will be free of Potassium Dichromate and safe to use.
It may take 2 to 3 weeks of avoiding exposure before improvement of your eruption begins.
Persistence of eczema in Potassium Dichromate sensitive people can occur for long periods even after exposure has stopped.

Possible Occupational Exposures:
    Construction workers
    Leather workers
    Laboratory Technologists
    Printing Machine operators
    Metal plating
    Machine operators
    Photo engraves
    Janitors

Other names you may see this chemical listed as:

Chromate
Chrome
Chromite
Chromium
Chromium oxide
Potassium dichromate
Potassium bichromate

© John L. Meisenheimer, M.D.  2004                                   WWW.OrlandoSkinDoc.com